Venice Palace 3

There are many hidden away palaces in Venice, not just those on the Grand Canal. Many of these palaces were owned by illustrious families

There are many hidden away palaces in Venice, not just those on the Grand Canal. Many of these palaces were owned by illustrious families. This palace is situated in the San Polo district, it is tucked away and is literally a hidden gem. It is a 14th century Venetian Gothic palace, not far from the magnificent Frari church. The closest water bus stop is San Toma. It was built by a sea captain in the service of the Venetian Republic, he was a hero in the war raged by Chioggia against Genoa. The palace has an impressive Gothic facade overlooking a picturesque canal, it is well preserved and is surmounted by elegant obelisks dating back to the 17th century. It has a lovely garden and courtyard, the rooms are sumptuous and decorated with gorgeous stuccoes. Recently sound proofing has been added on the ground floor, to allow late night dancing. It has undergone various alterations over the centuries, the most important and far-reaching of which was the work of architect Antonio Gaspari. Gaspari had been an ambassador of La Serenissima at the court of the Sun King at Versailles. The owner of the palace, probably influenced by the splendors of the French court, decided to add a new wing to the antique palace overlooking the courtyard. He also redesigned the main entrance and the facades around its courtyard. The interior decoration was renovated in a sumptuous manner. All the rooms of the palace are frescoed or decorated with stuccoes by the greatest artists of the period, such as Antonio Pellegrini and Jacopo GuaranĂ .

The Palace , formerly also Dogale Palace as the seat of the Doge , a symbol of the city of Venice and Venetian Gothic masterpiece
This is a delightful palace on the Grand Canal dating back to the 1600's, and conveniently located between Ca Foscari and Ca Rezzonico
The palace was built around 1550 by the Cubli family, wealthy Greek merchants ,and the architecture is attributed to Jacopo Sansovino, a follower of Michelangelo